Posts tagged occupy wall street
10:16 am - Thu, Dec 22, 2011
201 notes
9:53 pm - Thu, Dec 15, 2011
17 notes
6:21 am - Tue, Dec 13, 2011
246 notes

youthiswasted:

This is why we protest: Congressional staffers behind SOPA get hired as entertainment industry lobbyists

istellar:

Congressional staffers behind SOPA get shiny new jobs as entertainment industry lobbyists

Allison Halataei (former deputy chief of staff for House Judiciary Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas)) and Lauren Pastarnack (former senior aide on the Senate Judiciary Committee) have cool new jobs. Having written the Internet-destroying Stop Online Piracy Act for their bosses while drawing a salary at public expense, they’ve now accepted massive raises to go work for the entertainment companies who stand to benefit from the law they wrote. Their new job? Helping to run the campaign to push their law through.

Halataei recently joined the National Music Publishers’ Association, and Pastarnack is jumping to the Motion Pictures Association of America, two lobbying groups pressing Congress to pass the proposals…

“This is one of those mega-fights where there is a lot of money at stake and whenever it gets to that, it’s kind of ‘Katy bar the door’ as far as what they’ll pay for talent,” said McCormick Group headhunter Ivan Adler. “This fits into the perfect scenario of why senior-level people from well-placed committees get hired, and it’s because they really know the three p’s: people, policy and process. And that makes them very valuable in the Washington marketplace.”

The former aides will face one-year lobbying bans, which means they cannot lobby the respective committees where they previously worked. But those bans don’t render the former aides useless to their new employers.

“They can provide invaluable insight to people on the outside — even in the consultation mode,” one tech industry lobbyist said, noting that Halataei had been Smith’s secondhand person and knows how the Texas Republican thinks and what would be an effective lobbying strategy.

12:30 pm - Tue, Nov 29, 2011
15 notes

While the Occupiers were dealing with such abuse, during civil disobedience, communities of color suffer these type of injustices simply because it’s Wednesday, and they may look like someone else. That’s what happens to us — and it’s accepted as if it were just a day of the week.

There have been discussions as to why there aren’t more blacks involved in the Occupy movement. I can’t speak for all of them, but I can speak about what I’ve read and the folks I’ve talked to directly about this. The type of outrage that pops up now at what many of us have lived with on a regular basis for years feels insulting.

It’s hard not to notice that once the right number of white folks are affected, people want to take to the street. Unemployment numbers are high? We’ve had high unemployment for years. People are living in or near the poverty line? Yeah — we know.

When minorities speak up and say there is an issue, we are told maybe we are doing something wrong. Perhaps we are targeted by the police because of what we are wearing. Perhaps we don’t look for jobs the right way. Maybe we aren’t educated enough. But now that it’s affecting other folks, now there’s a problem. Now we need to come together and fight the power. Someone tweeted at me that we need to come together and not point out silly differences like race because we’re in this together!

Ah.

Yes, we can — and have (there is support from various folks of color) — come together within this movement, but you can’t expect us to throw away ‘race’ and ignore history. Even the violence that’s happening with the Occupiers right now is looked at differently because of race. You can’t be surprised that people have reservations about this when you look at how our issues have been dealt with before.

I’m not making an argument for ignoring the movement because a lot of the movement ignored us. But I am saying take a moment to walk away from your righteousness to understand that your newfound plight has been some people’s plight for generations.

7:43 pm - Sat, Nov 26, 2011
20 notes

Write to Bradley Manning

Bradley Manning can receive mail and (money order) donations now, with some very specific restrictions/conditions. However, if you wish to contact him you can. Follow the rules on his lawyer’s website.

After over 530+ days in captivity, Manning gets his first appearance, albeit at a military court, next month. Ironically, the appearance is simply a placeholder formality to determine if grounds exist to move forward. Yeah, right, after all this time, maybe it was all just a mistake, right?

From my own experience with prison correspondence rules, they are very specific and the people who administer them are very particular. Think about it– that is not a job sought by free spirits and creative thinkers. If the restriction says no more than five pages, they mean it. Prison administrators will either return the entire six page letter to you, destroy it, or at least throw away the last page. Don’t waste time writing in to Bradley’s busy lawyer (as people are doing on his blog) asking about exceptions, or “what five pages” really means.

Also, prisoners pretty much anywhere can’t receive goods. If you want to help Bradley with pens, stamps or whatever, follow the rules and send him a money order he can use at the prison store.

The good news is that this means Bradley is aware of the support he is receiving outside, as well as having some minimal situational awareness of what is going on in the world around him.

More info also from the Bradley Manning Support Network. (source)

(Source: 99anon, via youthiswasted)

8:59 am - Wed, Nov 23, 2011
116 notes

The Police might be blue-collar or part of the “99%,” but they enforce the laws that keep the divide between the rich and the poor intact. The police are the protectors of the 1%. The police are the ones firing tear gas and rubber bullets whenever a demonstration gets out of hand. They are the ones who stand between every hungry person and the corporate grocery shelves stocked with food, between every homeless person and the buildings standing empty, between every immigrant and her family. The police are the ones who beat Occupy Wall St. protestors, who gunned down Sean Bell and Oscar Grant, and who murdered Fred Hampton in his bed. They are the ones who once enforced segregation in the United States and who back the bosses and the 1% in every labor strike.

The Police are an institution, that is an extension of the 1%, and are fundamentally and very concretely in the way of what we really want-the end of a society based on class divisions. The downtown police officers might be the nicest people in the world, but they will still be the ones evicting us from the park. They are still part of that same extension.

This means they’re not to be trusted by any of us involved in the occupation.

Occupational Hazards: On the hidden dangers of police, politicians and other perils presented to the Occupy movement « autonomousappalachia

A good article. Here’s another good section:

Dogmatic
Nonviolence

Tunisia and Egypt are commonly cited as one of the main inspirations for the Occupy movement. Indeed these revolutions were inspiring to many around the world. However they have been mystifyingly portrayed as “nonviolent” revolutions. This could not be further from the truth. A quick survey of news reports show that while protestors for the most part remained unarmed (as in guns), these were far from nonviolent revolutions. These revolutions utilized a wide range of tactics including many peaceful occupations and marches. But, when necessary, people regularly defended themselves from police and pro-government thugs with burning barricades, rocks, and clubs. Police stations were burned, government offices were ransacked, cop cars overturned. These actions were taken out of a combination of rage at a corrupt system as well as a necessity to defend oneself, and in the end it worked.


So why do we bring this up? With little debate the Occupy movement has adopted a stance of nonviolence while at the same time holding up two, oftentimes violent, revolutions as its main inspiration. On the surface this is simply hypocritical, but it also brings up an important question. Is dogmatic adherence to nonviolence in our best interest as a movement?


We are not interested in perpetuating the violence/nonviolence dichotomy. Nonviolent tactics and more militant ones both have their strengths and weaknesses. We should choose our tactics based on effectiveness, not religious adherence to nonviolence nor fetishization of violence. Just as the people of Egypt at times had to resort to self defense and property destruction to achieve there goals, there may be a time in which the Occupy movement finds it to be strategic to use these tactics as well. And we should be ready to support them. It might be that some people have been beaten down so many times, their rage bottled up for so long that they topple a police barricade, or fight back when the police try to tear down our tents, or break out the windows at a bank. And we should support them, for their rage is real and just. That day might be a month from now, a year from now, or it might be this very moment.

The Occupy movement should wholeheartedly embrace a diversity of tactics from peaceful sit-ins to self defense against police attacks and economic sabotage. That does not mean that we use all of those tactics or that everyone has to agree with them, but at the very least we should be willing to not denounce each other in the media or cooperate with the police over differences in tactics.”

(via workandentropy)

(via dammitcaleb-deactivated20130328)

5:45 pm - Tue, Nov 22, 2011
9 notes
karnythia:

ladyatheist:

Regarding this Naomi Wolf bashing- she has addressed it. She’s not seeing the tweets because the posts are being sent from her Facebook, so she’s on FB, not Twitter. (via capncaptian)
——————————————————————————
I do like that she apologized for the statement. (However, the whole “playing the victim” thing is not cute. Admit you were wrong and move the fuck on.) I would not say that I was “bashing” her. I pointed out a problematic statement that she made and, in the process I happened to uncover a much bigger problem in the movement.
Instead of recognizing that the statement made was problematic, a few people decided to tell me and others to “chill the fuck out” or “get over it.” That is a very big problem. These are the same people who don’t want the 1% to tell them to “get a job.” Aren’t they expressing the same type of sentiment when they tell people who are offended by something to “get over it.” This is why a good number of people find it hard to support occupy wall street. 
A good number of protesters feel as if they are above criticism. If you are a liberal and you dare to question the movement, you are simply brushed off. I firmly believe that if occupy wall street wants to accomplish anything, they really need to start taking these criticisms seriously. It does not bode well for the movement for them to continue to ignore and/or downplay the problems they have.

It’s not bashing to say that she said something fucked up. The fact that it came from her FB feed actually doesn’t help her case since FB doesn’t have a 140 character limit.

karnythia:

ladyatheist:

Regarding this Naomi Wolf bashing- she has addressed it. She’s not seeing the tweets because the posts are being sent from her Facebook, so she’s on FB, not Twitter. (via capncaptian)

——————————————————————————

I do like that she apologized for the statement. (However, the whole “playing the victim” thing is not cute. Admit you were wrong and move the fuck on.) I would not say that I was “bashing” her. I pointed out a problematic statement that she made and, in the process I happened to uncover a much bigger problem in the movement.

Instead of recognizing that the statement made was problematic, a few people decided to tell me and others to “chill the fuck out” or “get over it.” That is a very big problem. These are the same people who don’t want the 1% to tell them to “get a job.” Aren’t they expressing the same type of sentiment when they tell people who are offended by something to “get over it.” This is why a good number of people find it hard to support occupy wall street. 

A good number of protesters feel as if they are above criticism. If you are a liberal and you dare to question the movement, you are simply brushed off. I firmly believe that if occupy wall street wants to accomplish anything, they really need to start taking these criticisms seriously. It does not bode well for the movement for them to continue to ignore and/or downplay the problems they have.

It’s not bashing to say that she said something fucked up. The fact that it came from her FB feed actually doesn’t help her case since FB doesn’t have a 140 character limit.

(Source: womanistgamergirl)

11:32 am
48 notes

Bloomberg and NYPD seize the Wikileaks truck (11/20/11) and now claim “not to be able to locate it.”

youthiswasted:

More on this as it develops.

9:37 am
306 notes
youthiswasted:

It’s funny, as part of the coordinated media misdirection, the conservative (and some ‘liberal’) pundits claim that we - the protesters - are ‘an entitled generation,’ when in fact it is the Establishment’s entitlements which have bankrupted the system.

youthiswasted:

It’s funny, as part of the coordinated media misdirection, the conservative (and some ‘liberal’) pundits claim that we - the protesters - are ‘an entitled generation,’ when in fact it is the Establishment’s entitlements which have bankrupted the system.

(Source: bourbonstyledude)

9:29 am
45 notes
youthiswasted:

UC Davis Linda Katehi being escorted by guards in order to cross campus. On multiple occasions now she has refused to go outside, claiming that she feels “unsafe” on the campus she is charged with managing. Ms. Katehi, you ordered the use of excessive force on the students whose safety is your responsibility - how much of a hypocrite can you be for creating an atmosphere where people feel unsafe.
Linda Katehi is unfit to be chancellor of the university. She - and Lieutenant John A. Pike III, who calmly pepper-sprayed the seated students - need to resign and to face civil and criminal charges for their misconduct.
Please sign the petition, launched by the school’s faculty, asking for her resignation: http://www.change.org/petitions/police-pepper-spray-peaceful-uc-davis-students-ask-chancellor-katehi-to-resign
frunky:

this lady is pathetic and so unaccountable for her actions.
if she has to be escorted like that by security when she is in the company of the students of the school she governs,  she is completely unfit to be the chancellor of uc davis.
what a fucking joke.


She doesn’t feel safe?  Somehow I think the translation for that is: every time I step outside those vicious students say mean things about me and I don’t like that, so I’m going to be a drama queen and then everyone will see I’m the real victim here!

youthiswasted:

UC Davis Linda Katehi being escorted by guards in order to cross campus. On multiple occasions now she has refused to go outside, claiming that she feels “unsafe” on the campus she is charged with managing. Ms. Katehi, you ordered the use of excessive force on the students whose safety is your responsibility - how much of a hypocrite can you be for creating an atmosphere where people feel unsafe.

Linda Katehi is unfit to be chancellor of the university. She - and Lieutenant John A. Pike III, who calmly pepper-sprayed the seated students - need to resign and to face civil and criminal charges for their misconduct.

Please sign the petition, launched by the school’s faculty, asking for her resignation: http://www.change.org/petitions/police-pepper-spray-peaceful-uc-davis-students-ask-chancellor-katehi-to-resign

frunky:

this lady is pathetic and so unaccountable for her actions.

if she has to be escorted like that by security when she is in the company of the students of the school she governs, she is completely unfit to be the chancellor of uc davis.

what a fucking joke.

She doesn’t feel safe?  Somehow I think the translation for that is: every time I step outside those vicious students say mean things about me and I don’t like that, so I’m going to be a drama queen and then everyone will see I’m the real victim here!

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