Posts tagged economy
6:02 pm - Thu, Oct 18, 2012
12,833 notes
tavbro:

zeurel:

razorbladesammich:

g-aesthetic:

simply-war:

Oh our government…Truly the most functional and most effective in the world.

REBLOG this and never forget it.

THIS is what frustrates me the most about people who complain that Obama was ineffective. If you consider the childish, playground-bully tactics the GOP adopted, it’s astounding he got as much done as he did.

The land of the free~

i wish i could show this to my dad.

tavbro:

zeurel:

razorbladesammich:

g-aesthetic:

simply-war:

Oh our government…Truly the most functional and most effective in the world.

REBLOG this and never forget it.

THIS is what frustrates me the most about people who complain that Obama was ineffective. If you consider the childish, playground-bully tactics the GOP adopted, it’s astounding he got as much done as he did.

The land of the free~

i wish i could show this to my dad.

(via commodifiedsouls)

3:04 pm - Wed, Aug 22, 2012
950 notes

(Source: lafaux, via sarahlee310)

12:47 pm - Mon, Jul 16, 2012
193 notes
motherjones:


By the end of the work day I’m exhausted and dirty…Back at the Labor Ready office, I have to wait nearly 30 minutes to receive my check. The job paid $8 an hour—minimum wage. For five hours of labor, I get $37.34 after taxes. I am not paid, however, for the four hours on call, or the time spent in transit to and from the job site, or waiting to get paid. None of this meets the legal definition of wage theft, but it sure feels like it.

“Everyone Only Wants Temps,” in which our reporter signs up with this economy’s employer of last resort.

motherjones:

By the end of the work day I’m exhausted and dirty…Back at the Labor Ready office, I have to wait nearly 30 minutes to receive my check. The job paid $8 an hour—minimum wage. For five hours of labor, I get $37.34 after taxes. I am not paid, however, for the four hours on call, or the time spent in transit to and from the job site, or waiting to get paid. None of this meets the legal definition of wage theft, but it sure feels like it.

Everyone Only Wants Temps,” in which our reporter signs up with this economy’s employer of last resort.

2:05 pm - Mon, May 21, 2012
144 notes
Does this person, with his vast spaces for entertainment, honestly believe that the people who depend on things like Medicaid and Social Security, and small-business loans and Pell grants, are emboldened by the circumstances of their lives? Does he believe that these people who are living paycheck-to-paycheck and only asking that the system be a little bit more fair are actually as smug and entitled as every syllable he’s ever written proclaims Brooks to be? All over America, people are absolutely petrified that somebody in their family might get sick, thereby bankrupting them forever. All over America, people are worried that their mortgages are laden with small-print land mines. All over America, people are living in sheer abject terror that the job will disappear, or the rest of their 401K will go up in smoke, or grandma’s Alzheimer’s will offer them the choice of eating government cheese or letting the old girl die in her own filth in some unregulated nursing home. These are the people that David Brooks believes are destroying the country because their unreasoning hubris prevents government from making their lives even more difficult. I’m fking done with this nonsense. The man should be pelted with rotting fish.
9:56 am - Fri, Mar 16, 2012
5,200 notes
12:49 pm - Fri, Dec 9, 2011
321 notes

brooklynmutt:

Inside Job, Narrated by Matt Damon (Full Length HD)

 ‘Inside Job’ provides a comprehensive analysis of the global financial crisis of 2008, which at a cost over $20 trillion, caused millions of people to lose their jobs and homes in the worst recession since the Great Depression, and nearly resulted in a global financial collapse. Through exhaustive research and extensive interviews with key financial insiders, politicians, journalists, and academics, the film traces the rise of a rogue industry which has corrupted politics, regulation, and academia. It was made on location in the United States, Iceland, England, France, Singapore, and China.

adistinctivetastewingtipsandloafers, via mostexerent

10:20 pm - Thu, Dec 1, 2011
5,023 notes
11:04 pm - Wed, Nov 30, 2011
50 notes
But it won’t be funny when the [housing] bubble bursts and people start going bankrupt, taking banks down with them, and then the markets and then the dollar.
Bill Maher, 2005 - NPR (via brooklynmutt)
6:19 pm - Tue, Nov 29, 2011
18 notes

[…] The Rakoff ruling shines a light on the way these crappy settlements have evolved into a kind of cheap payoff system, in which crimes may be committed over and over again, and the SEC’s only role is to take a bribe each time the offenders slip up and get caught.

If you never have to worry about serious punishments, or court findings of criminal guilt (which would leave you exposed to crippling lawsuits), then there’s simply no incentive to stop committing fraud. These SEC settlements simply become part of the cost of doing business, as Rakoff notes:

As for common experience, a consent judgment that does not involve any admissions and that results in only very modest penalties is just as frequently viewed, particularly in the business community, as a cost of doing business imposed by having to maintain a working relationship with a regulatory agency, rather than as any indication of where the real truth lies. This, indeed, is Citigroup’s position in this very case.

That line, “a cost of doing business imposed by having to maintain a working relationship with a regulatory agency,” is one of the more brutally damning things you’ll ever see a judge write. Rakoff is saying that these fines are payoffs to keep the SEC off the banks’ backs. They’re like the pad that numbers-runners or drug dealers pay to urban precinct-houses every month to keep cops from making real arrests. That’s what he means when he refers to “maintaning a working relationship.” It’s heavy stuff.  

On the other hand, both the SEC and Citigroup insist that this secretive payoff system is defensible and must continue. They clearly believe, sincerely, that none of this stuff is really the public’s business. 

This is an extraordinarily condescending attitude and shows exactly how little they think of the public at large. One wonders if decisions like Rakoff’s will at least help to wake the government up. 

11:04 am - Wed, Nov 9, 2011
20 notes
My driver’s license expires, the milk in my refrigerator expires, the only thing that doesn’t expire is Grover Norquist’s pledge – and that’s nuts.

Rep. Steve LaTourette (R) of Ohio, who signed the Americans for Tax Reform pledge to never raise taxes in 1994.

The Christian Science Monitor’s Gail Russell Chaddock writes about increasingly strident Congressional criticism of the tax pledge.

This could be construed as a hopeful sign for the deficit supercommittee, which has been hung up on whether increased tax revenue.

Here’s another zinger from Democrat Rep. Rob Andrews (N.J.), one of the few Democrats who ever signed the pledge.

“I signed the pledge in 1992, and I understood it to mean that for the next term, if I were reelected, I would not vote to raise taxes,” he says. “I honored that pledge.”

“But I never renewed it. I never considered it to be like my marriage vows, I’m married to Camille Andrews not Grover Norquist. I promised her to be faithful until death do us part, and I mean it. I did not promise him to oppose tax increases until death do us part.”

(via dcdecoder)

(Source: dcdecoder, via abaldwin360-deactivated20130708)

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